Saturday, March 26, 2011

Groupon Deal - Phoenix

Fabulous deal found for the East Valley. I got one for my daughter, and her friends are all getting them too. Must hurry on over to Groupon.com, deal says 14hrs left or until the limited quantity is reached. Go over to Groupon.com and enter the city - Phoenix, at the top of the page.


Horses were once considered man’s best friend, but after the invention of the dog, the horse was rebranded as man’s eccentric, oat-obsessed uncle. Take a journey with the kindest of kinsmen with today's Groupon for horse-riding lessons at Desert Trails Horsemanship & Tiny Tots Corral in Queen Creek. Choose from three lesson options:

* For $99, you get five one-hour intermediate riding lessons (a $205 value).
* For $55, you get five 30-minute beginners horse-riding lessons (a $115 value).
* For $35, you get a two-hour basic horsemanship lesson (a $70 value).

Desert Trails Horsemanship trains riders in basic skills necessary to safely steer steeds in their outdoor classroom corral. Experienced instructors distill years of professional horse training, riding, and competition into simple lessons for gallopers of all levels.

Pony pros can continue their equine education in the five one-hour intermediate course that imbues pupils with the standard seat method, a riding style that emphasizes coordination, center of gravity control, and reciting lines from National Velvet. Filly freshmen can sign up for the 30-minute beginners' curriculum that extends to balance and flexibility exercises, rein control, and moving out at a walk to develop confidence in the saddle. The two-hour basic horsemanship lesson offers a crash course for students aged 12 and older to become future horse owners by practicing proper grooming techniques and studying sturdy knots for hoof lacing.

Located near the San Tan Mountain Regional Park, Desert Trails' riders have convenient access to scenic trots through picturesque nature trails. Students should dress for the weather and wear long pants with boots covering their ankles to protect both the rider and horses' sense of Victorian modest.

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